April 18, 2021

40 Photos That Prove Why Every Child Should Have a Pet

Pets aren’t just animals to us, they are good friends and life companions. Yes. they can’t speak, but they have their very own way to communicate with us and we all feel like we can perfectly understand all of their feelings. It’s also scientifically proven that living with a dog and developing a strong bond with an animal friend is a great thing for children growing up.

If you are still not convinced in adopting a dog for your sons, here is a gallery of heartwarming photos of children perfectly getting along with their little furry friends.

They are their first best friend and a companion for each new milestone. But Fido or Fluffy isn’t around just for cuteness–pets help little ones learn about caring for others, and – of course – how to have fun.

Creating a social and emotional bond between a child and their pet can be essential for the way they see the world around them and help to mold their personality. Also the development of a child can be accelerated by interactions with pets.

Below is a too-cute-for-words selection of 40 pictures that show the amazing bond between a child and the family pet.

#1

Erin Vey

#2

Dejan Klajić

The Powerful Bond Between People and Pets, psychologist Elizabeth Anderson wrote, “Nothing less than alchemy is involved when animals and children get together, and the resulting magic has healing properties that work well.”

But is it generally true that pets are linked to the psychological well-being of children? Yes, according to an excellent review of 22 studies of the impact of companion animals on child development. While some of the findings are mixed, the authors concluded that growing up with pets is linked to higher self-esteem, cognitive development, and social skills.

#3

Vin J.

#4

Andrey Volobuev

What is it about living with pets that makes kids better off? The authors of the review suggest several possibilities. These include the impact of pets on reducing stress, providing social support and companionship, and improving children’s  communication skills. But a new study suggests a different answer, and I expect the results will be controversial.

The research, which will appear in the September 2017 issue of the journal Anthrozoös, was conducted by a group of high-powered statisticians from the RAND Corporation. All of the members of the research team had pets or grew up with pets, and they anticipated that their analyses would demonstrate the positive impact of companion animals on child development.

#5

To answer these questions, the investigators turned to a large existing data set, the California Health Interview Survey. This is an ongoing project that assesses the health and well-being of Californians. For the survey, telephone interviews are conducted with randomly selected adults, adolescents, and parents of children under 11. In addition to information on health and behavior, the survey includes items related to socioeconomic status and demographic factors such as race, ethnicity, and sex. In the 2003 administration, participants were also asked whether their household included a cat, a dog, or both. (In this earlier post, I described another recent publication in which RAND researchers used this data set to study differences between adults who did and did not keep pets.)  

#6

spacecatsociety

#7

#8

Jen Hendricks

To study the impact of pets on children, the researchers used the responses from households with at least one child between the ages of 5 and 11. Parents were asked a series of questions related to their children’s physical and mental health. Data from 5,191 children were included in the study; 2,236 lived in homes with a dog or cat, and 2,955 lived in households that did not include any animals.

#9

Kevin Duffy

#10

imgur.com

#11

JarodKnoten

To study the impact of pets on children, the researchers used the responses from households with at least one child between the ages of 5 and 11. Parents were asked a series of questions related to their children’s physical and mental health. Data from 5,191 children were included in the study; 2,236 lived in homes with a dog or cat, and 2,955 lived in households that did not include any animals.

#12

hkh25

#13

Pet-Owning Kids Are Generally Better Off

As expected, the researchers found that children living with pets were generally better off than children who did not have a pet. Children raised in families with pets were reported by their parents to:

  • have better general health
  • be more obedient
  • be more physically active
  • be less moody
  • have fewer behavior problems
  • have fewer learning problems

#14

DaytonF7

#15

grin660

#16

JoeSicbo

#17

#18

imgur.com

#19

#20

imgur.com

#21

anwarulrana

#22

unknown

#23

Chris Dieterle

#24

Viktoria Haack

#25

Ivette Ivens

#26

attackofthecute.com

#27

whartz

#28

Buzzspucket

#29

Fani Kosturska

#30

#31

imgur.com

#32

#33

SThist

#34

imgur.com

#35

#36

Natasha Parfenova

#37

Alina Mayboroda

#38

Slavina Bahchevanova

#39

jesskady

#40