April 22, 2021

Lace Street Art Created With Ceramic, Textile, And Spray Paint On The Side Of A French Lace Museum

On France’s northern shores lies the port city of Calais, a municipality that once was a destination for lace manufacturers. To escape economic and social difficulties, English textile artists and engineers immigrated in the late 19th Century, often establishing clandestine operations that defied patent laws by bringing specialty machines and practices to the region. Soon after, Calais became an industrial hub for lace manufacturing, employing around 40,000 residents.

A new mural by Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon celebrates that rich history through an oversized textile that envelops the facade of a factory. The public artwork features delicate mesh and floral elements that cover the side of the Cité de la Dentelle et de la Mode, the city’s fashion and lace museum. NeSpoon chose this particular motif, which dates back to 1894, from the institution’s archive before spray painting its intricate details onto the building.

Check out the video below to see the lace motif in-progress, and find more of the artist’s textile-based pieces on Behance and Instagram.

More info: Instagram | behance.net | Facebook

The museum is located in the city of Calais, which is well known for its lace-making tradition

Image credits: NeSpoon

“In lace there is an aesthetic code which is deeply embedded in every culture,” says NeSpoon. “In every lace we find symmetry, and some kind of order and harmony. Isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively?”

It’s housed in a restored 19th-century factory building

Image credits: NeSpoon

“Why laces? Because in laces there is an aesthetic code, which is deeply embedded in every culture. In every lace we find symmetry, some kind of order and harmony, isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively?” reads the artist’s Behance profile.

Most of NeSpoon’s works consist of prints of traditional lace

Image credits: NeSpoon

“Calais in northern France is famous for its lace-making tradition. In the past, local factories employed 40,000 people in the lace-making industry,” reads the description of the project. “Today in the city exists a unique lace museum. It is housed in a recently restored 19th-century factory building. In addition to the great collection of lace, it holds 200-year-old, still working lace-making machines. Learning how to control this machine at the master level took up to 12 years. The weaving master controlled 11,000 threads at the same time.”

For this project, the artist chose a machine lace pattern designed in 1894 that she found in the museum archive

Image credits: NeSpoon

For this particular project, the artist chose to spray-paint a machine lace pattern that was designed in 1894. She happened across this pattern in one of the catalogs available in the museum archive.

Here’s a little video from the artist’s Instagram profile, capturing the process of spray-painting

 

View this post on Instagram

 

In progress. Calais / France @cite_dentelle_mode

A post shared by NeSpoon (@nes.poon) on

Image credits: NeSpoon

Here’s what people think about this intricate mural

Recently NeSpoon has created work in Wroclaw, Auckland, Pont-l’Abbé, and Warsaw. You can see more of her public murals and installations on Behance.

NeSpoon, Pont-l’Abbe, France, 2016. Image courtesy of NeSpoon.

NeSpoon tells My Modern Met her work is akin to “public jewelry” turning things like utility boxes, abandoned homes and street signs into something beautiful.

Jewelry makes people look pretty, my public jewelry has the same goal, make public places look better. I would like people who discover, here and there, my small applications, to smile and just simply feel better.

NeSpoon, Pont-l’Abbe, France, 2016. Image courtesy of NeSpoon.

NeSpoon, Drée, France, 2015. Image Courtesy of NeSpoon.

NeSpoon says she finds freedom in using public spaces as her canvas. Her unique brand of street art is painted directly onto a surface with an intricate stencil, woven into its environment and even translated in clay. Like a spider web, NeSpoon’s textile work intertwines through space while reaching for points of structural support.

NeSpoon, Drée, France, 2015. Image Courtesy of NeSpoon..

NeSpoon’s ceramic work effortlessly melds into organic and industrial forms; a secret discovery in the hollow of a tree or in a much-overlooked stone wall.

NeSpoon, Auckland, New Zealand, 2016. Image courtesy of NeSpoon.

NeSpoon, Auckland, New Zealand, 2016. Image Courtesy of NeSpoon.

NeSpoon, Pont-l’Abbe, France, 2015.

NeSpoon, Warsaw, Poland, 2016. Image Courtesy of NeSpoon.

NeSpoon, Warsaw, Poland, 2016. Image Courtesy of NeSpoon. Click for larger image.

NeSpoon expresses in her artist essay that her work isn’t merely about beautification.

In laces there is an aesthetic code, which is deeply embedded in every culture. In every lace we find symmetry, some kind of order and harmony, isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively?

In addition to her street art, NeSpoon has also undertaken since 2012 a decades-long almost meditative work Thoughtswhere she hand-forms porcelain petals from leftover clay. She intends to create nearly 35 thousand petals, which she’ll invite visitors to touch and wade through her thoughts.

NeSpoon, Thoughts, Image Courtesy of NeSpoon.

Image credits: NeSpoon