April 22, 2021

This Bat Rescue Organization Saved This Bat And Showed Off His Cuteness And Harmlessness Through These 20 Pics

Bats Qld (Flying Foxes & Microbats) Inc. is a volunteer-run, not-for-profit organization rescues, rehabilitates, and releases Flying Foxes and Microbats across South East Queensland (Gold Coast to Brisbane area), Australia. It also educates the young and old on the importance of Flying Foxes in our ecosystem along with dispelling the myths that have always surrounded these amazing mammals.

And that’s not all! Luckily for the Internet, Bats Qld share photos and videos of their ‘patients’ to show just how adorable they really are. From napping to feeding to giving you that soul-crushing cute look, continue scrolling to check out the daily life of these little critters that look like cute sky puppies.

More info: batsqld.org.au | Facebook | Instagram

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Credits: batsqld

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Bats aren’t just pretty; they are important to our ecosystems. “Bats have meaningful roles in pollination and seed dispersal,” a spokesperson for Bats Qld reportedly said. “For example, the eucalyptus forest that the koalas rely on are pollinated by the flying foxes.” Also, these night flyers contribute to controlling insect populations.

Sadly, we often seem to forget these good deeds. “Humans are a threat to bats. Barbed wire, fruit netting, domestic pets, and car strikes are the most common reason they need help. The bigger picture would also include deforestation and habitat loss.”

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Credits: batsqld

These bad myths that surround these creatures serve them no good. We often hear that bats are dirty, but Bats Qld immediately rejects this notion: “Nope, bats are very clean animals and clean themselves all the time.”

Another misconception is that bats swoop people. “Nope again. Bats cannot fly like a bird but instead must drop before they can fly up, much like a paraglider. This is often mistaken for swooping.”

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Credits: batsqld

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You can also hear people say that bats have lots of diseases. “False, bats in Australia only carry one disease that poses a risk to people directly from the animal which is Australian Bat Lyssa Virus. This is found in less than 0.01% of the bat population.” Besides, there also is a fully effective post-exposure vaccine.

Interestingly, flying foxes have similar eyesight to ours, and although microbats don’t have the best vision, they can see as well.

The bottom line is that bats are doing their part in keeping the environment in check, and they deserve respect for their contribution.

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Credits: batsqld

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