This Gigantic Spiral Path Allows You to Walk Above the Treetops in Denmark

An incredible and creatively designed nature observatory called Camp Adventure is located about one hour south of Copenhagen, Denmark, in the preserved forest of Gisselfeld Klosters Skove.

The forest itself is privately owned but open to the public until sunset and is home to water cliffs, lakes and wetlands. It’s also a hilly region, which is very unusual in the area.

H/T: EFFEKT Architects

EFFEKT Architects

The walk will be 600 meters in total and there will be plenty of rest stops along the way where people can learn more about their surroundings. At the end of the walk will be a magnificent 45-meter spiraling observation tower.

EFFEKT Architects

A sturdy walking bridge, about 3000 feet long, was built to wind through the forest until the path eventually ends at the foot of a 148-foot tall observation tower. This tower looks like a spiral ramp that stretches above the trees. The Treetop Experience includes two different paths, one that allows you to stay on the ground and another high route that winds through the canopy of the trees, allowing visitors to look down on the forest below.

EFFEKT Architects
EFFEKT Architects

The higher path passes through the oldest parts of the forest, while the tower and the lower paths are located in the younger areas. The high walkway also features a variety of activities that teach visitors about the forest.

EFFEKT Architects

In 2017 after Camp Adventure was completed, the studio behind the project “EFEKT”, won the ICONIC Award for “Visionary Architecture.”

EFFEKT Architects

In addition to the breathtaking views of the forest and nearby lakes, creeks and wetlands, Camp Adventure also offers many other activities, including zip lines and an existing adventure sports facility.

EFFEKT Architects

Enormous Sculptures Rooted in Nature Are Like Mystical Goddesses of Music Festivals

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South African multidisciplinary artist Daniel Popper is known for his colossal figurative sculptures and spectacular public art installations at art and music events around the world. Daniel is well-known for his massive public art installations at top festivals like the Electric Forest festival in the USA,  Boom Festival in Portugal, Rainbow Serpent festival in Australia, as well as Afrikaburn in the Tankwa Karoo in South Africa.

One of Popper’s most recent sculptures, Modem Swamp, was an epic, 8-meter-tall (26-foot-tall) female figure at Modem Festival in Croatia. Created using steel and fiberglass, and covered in concrete, the whimsical character is posed holding her face in front of her head like a mask, revealing the wild jungle growing within her skull.
At night, projection mapping makes the piece look like it’s made from chrome.

Each sculpture has a story behind it, but I like to leave the questions about each piece a little bit open, so people can come and bring their own ideas to it,” Popper claimed. “I want people to come here and ask questions of themselves about their relationship with nature.

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? I bet they do.
Scroll down to see more of Popper’s incredible sculptures and explore even more of his growing portfolio on his instagram.

1. The first major U.S. exhibition of artist Daniel Popper at The Morton Arboretum.

Photograph: Courtesy The Morton Arboretum

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4. South African multidisciplinary artist Daniel Popper creates giant figurative sculptures for art and music events around the world.

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6. Each larger-than-life figure brings magic and fantasy to the places they inhabit.

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8. The sculptures present the connection between humans and trees.

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Related articles:

Artist Olga Ziemska Brings Incredible Human Shaped Sculptures Using Natural Objects Only

Artist Creates Fanciful Driftwood Sculptures That Look Like Spirits of Nature

British Artist Penny Hardy Constructs Life-Size Sculptures Made From Discarded Machinery




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