November 27, 2020

6 Pics Of World’s Famous Landmarks From Above

Landmarks are wonderful things, aren’t they? Whether big or small they all hold an important place in the history books, from South America to Australia and beyond. If you go into any form of travel shop or into the home of anyone who enjoys jetting around the world, you’ll likely see many shots of the well-known landmarks in all of their glory.

It can be easy, especially if you travel a lot, to take things a bit too seriously. Perhaps the ‘shine’ involved in getting excited about getting on a plane, a train or a bus is wearing off, and you need something new or different in order to keep your mind occupied. In this instance, we’re simply going to run through a selection of images that detail some of the places you may have been to – from above, and from below.

Don’t let the postcards and Instagrams fool you: There’s more than one way to look at the wonders of the world.

A front-facing view isn’t the only way to see the Taj Mahal. Christ the Redeemer is breathtaking, and also a prime spot for selfies. The Arc de Triomphe actually looks cooler from far away.

Just something to consider the next time you’re planning a vacation.

More info: budgetdirect.com.au

Sydney Opera House (Sydney, Australia)

Image credits: budgetdirect

Sydney, as a city, is just kind of ‘there’. We don’t particularly think it has too much character as a whole, but when it comes to the Opera House, you’ve got a building that people will continue to associate with the country of Australia for decades upon decades to come.

It’s on a whole new level when it comes to the quality of landmarks, and seeing it from above really is a lot of fun. Why? Because you’re going to get a completely different angle no matter where you’re standing, mainly because of how odd the design is. We love it either way, though.

“With Kronborg in mind,” wrote Sydney Opera House’s architect, Jørn Utzon, “I was convinced that a new building in such a position as to be seen from all sides, had to be a large sculptural building.” Utzon was keenly aware of how the structure would occupy Sydney Harbour since he lived near Kronberg Castle, which occupies a similar position beyond a steep drop, sandwiched by the coasts of Denmark and Sweden.

30 St. Mary Axe ‘The Gherkin’ (London, England)

Image credits: budgetdirect

The Gherkin in London is one of those buildings that everyone knows, but nobody really knows what it’s for. Regardless of that, though, the architect who was in charge of building it almost certainly knew what he was doing, and yes, we’re basing that off of this image alone.

We love seeing things that are different when it comes to landmarks, and this certainly fits the bill. When looking straight down you can just see, feel and experience this lotus-like vibe that anyone can appreciate. It’s the best ‘design’ you’re going to see on this list, by quite some distance too.

Eiffel Tower (Paris, France)

Image credits: budgetdirect

It’s the big one (literally).

The Eiffel Tower is big, bold and beautiful, and despite all that has happened over the course of the last few years in Paris, the Eiffel Tower has continued to stand tall as one o the beacons of strength and solidarity amongst the French people.

There are three levels that you can look out on when you go up the Eiffel Tower, and trust us when we tell you that the second level is enough to make anyone dizzy. So then, you can probably imagine (with the help of this shot), just how unnerving being up at the top would be for someone who doesn’t exactly like heights.

Statue of Liberty (New York City, USA)

Image credits: budgetdirect

An aerial view of the Statue of Liberty offers a clear look at the 11-pronged star on which it sits. The star may look like it was designed for the purpose, but it is actually a former fort, built a year before the War of 1812 to protect New York Harbor. Tour boats and commuter ferries pass there today.

The Colosseum (Rome, Italy)

Image credits: budgetdirect

This head-down view of the Colosseum looks pretty different to when it was first built for animal hunts, executions, and gladiator battles, nearly 2,000 years ago. Somewhere between 50-90,000 people of all classes would have gathered here, protected from the sun by enormous vela (canvas awnings) wrangled by hundreds of strong men, probably from the Roman navy.

Shwedagon Pagoda (Yangon, Myanmar)

Image credits: budgetdirect

Legend has it Myanmar’s most sacred Buddhist stupa is 2,600 years old, making it the world’s oldest Buddhist stupa and the oldest landmark on our list. Scholars estimate it’s a remarkable 11-15 centuries old. Either way, the building has been enhanced over the years. The golden roof has been replenished by devotees, including the 15th-century Queen Shin Sawbu (BinnyaThau), who donated her bodyweight in gold.