October 29, 2020

Unveiling The Story Of Predjama Castle — The Castle In The Cave

Ljubljana makes a terrific base for day trips to see some famous caves, castles, and medieval towns. A truly dramatic Renaissance castle built within a cave mouth in south-central Slovenia over 800 years ago. Once an impregnable fortress, the castle includes a dungeon, a 16th-century treasure chest, and Erazem’s Nook, an eerie hiding place right at the top. The cave below the castle is part of the 14km Predjama cave system.

If you only have time for one excursion the combination of Predjama Castle and Postojna Cave is a great choice, but if you want to see the most spectacular cave, go to the Škocjan Caves for an unforgettable tour Through the Underground Canyon.

Predjama Castle:Website

Predjama Castle in Slovenia is an incredible 16th-century castle built into the side of a cave.

Stock Photos from Janez Zalaznik/Shutterstock

Predjama Castle is an easy drive from the Slovenian capital of Ljubljana (or, in our case, a bus ride to Postojna Caves and then a quick taxi ride with a very informative man). If you’re travelling Europe and you think (as my sister and I did) that you’ve seen castles before, so you don’t need to see one more… Make a detour to see Predjama Castle. We’re so glad our Croatian friend encouraged us to go. It is incredibly unique and fascinating. Everything about it is designed for sieges and adapted for the cave environment.

It’s not just built beside a cave – the cave is an integral part of its structure. There are rooms and corridors that have solid rock for one wall. There are staircases between levels that are carved into cave passageways. The chimney in the kitchen is a natural hole in the cave. The cave ceiling actually overhangs some of the castle roofs, offering further protection from the elements.

The original castle dates back to the 13th century and has passed through the hands of many nobles.

Stock Photos from Dinozzzave/Shutterstock

As one of the interpretive signs says, it was really designed for a siege environment, not to be a pleasant place to live. There are actually runnels carved into some of the cave walls to direct dripping water. We were there on a rainy day and I think it was actually warmer outside of the castle, in the rain. I certainly get the impression it was continuously damp and miserable. Deeper in the cave, there’s a series of pipes and funnels designed to collect clean drinking water that had dripped through the cave ceiling, in case the other water sources were poisoned.

Stock Photos from Haidamac/Shutterstock

There’s a whole section of the castle that was deeper in the cave. It would have been subdivided in the past, but because no one really wanted to live here past the medieval period, there are few records of what was actually there except the evidence left behind in the carved rock. There’s an extensive network of about 14 km’s worth of caves and it’s unclear how deep the livable spaces went.

Stock Photos from blazg/Shutterstock

According to the excellent audio-guides, there was a famous siege in the 1400s in which the Hungarians tried to defeat Erasmus Lueger, a sort of Robin Hood figure. His people could use the cave network to sneak out to surrounding communities and fetch supplies. He apparently taunted his opponents by tossing down fresh cherries at them; as they didn’t know about the cave system, this was baffling. Erasmus ended up losing the siege, however, due to a traitorous servant. The lavatory was a bit more exposed than the rest of the castle (likely so the, uh, leavings would drop directly in the stream below), and the servant lit a lantern when his boss was on the toilet, resulting in him being struck by a cannonball and killed.

Stock Photos from Sharon Wildie/Shutterstock

There are still original secret passageways that were used to keep the castle supplied with food in times of siege.

Stock Photos from Marko Razpotnik Sest/ShutterstockStock Photos from Pavel Dobrovsky/Shutterstock